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Presidents Born in July

July 6, 2016

Four Presidents were born in July.  Two were the sons of former Presidents.  One was never elected President or Vice President, and one was born on the 4th of July.

John Quincy Adams was born on July 11, 1767 to John and Abigail Adams.  His father was Washington’s two-term Vice President before becoming President himself.  He was still alive when John Quincy was inaugurated.  John Adams ran for re-election in 1800 and was defeated by Thomas Jefferson.  John Quincy Adams ran for re-election in 1828 and was defeated by Andrew Jackson.

George W. Bush was born on July 6, 1946 to George H.W. and Barbara Bush.  His father was Reagan’s two-term Vice President before becoming President himself.  Both of George W.’s parents were still living when he became President.  Although George H.W. Bush was defeated for re-election by Bill Clinton in 1992, George W. Bush served two terms as President.  Because the father was the 41st President and the son was the 43rd, they are often referred to as Bush 41 and Bush 43.

Gerald Ford was born on July 14, 1913.  He was never elected President or Vice President.  He was appointed Vice President in 1974 as per the 25th Amendment and then succeeded to the office upon the resignation of Richard Nixon.  His decision to pardon former President Nixon was very unpopular and cost him the Presidency when he ran for a term of his own in 1976.  Decades later, some of his harshest critics finally admitted he had put the healing of the nation above his own political interest.

John Calvin Coolidge was born on July 4, 1872.  He was named after his father and grandfather. He dropped his first name, but he did name his first son John.  His younger son was Calvin Junior.  Historians, most of whom celebrate executive energy, have often been critical of Coolidge’s leadership style.  However, he was exactly the sort of man needed to restore public confidence following a period of scandal.  He ran for re-election and enjoyed a successful term of his own.  He could have run and won again in 1928, but he chose instead to step aside.

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