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The Battle of New Orleans

January 7, 2015

The war could have been avoided, but slow communications delayed receipt of the olive branch until it was too late.  After two and a half years the war was over, but once again slow communications kept that news from the distant battlefield.  On January 8, 1815 British regulars marched against a coalition of frontiersmen, free blacks, Creoles, Choctaws, and pirates in the Battle of New Orleans.

The British suffered over 2,000 casualties; the Americans only a handful.  The battle had no affect on the war’s outcome, but it did produce two lasting results: (1) It increased America’s self-respect, and (2) It elevated the American general to national prominence.

The people would never forget the General’s victory at New Orleans, and they would show their undying gratitude by electing him President in 1828 and re-electing him in 1832.  Today his portrait is on the twenty dollar bill.

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